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Should quarterbacks have input in personnel matters?

April 17, 2018 5:53 pm

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The report that Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers feels frustration over not being involved in personnel decisions that affect him creates the impression that other quarterbacks get that kind of consideration. Few, if any, ever do.

So here’s the question: Should they?

Quarterbacks are expected to serve as an extension of the coaching staff, setting the example for other players by showing up early, staying late, studying film, and doing everything the team wants, and more. Plenty of quarterbacks are expected to be even more vocal and direct in serving as de facto coaches on the field, leveraging the credibility that they bring to the table because they suit up and play.

So if a quarterback is expected to behave like he’s part employee and part management, shouldn’t the quarterback at least be in the loop as to the decisions made by management? Even if the team will do what it’s going to do without the blessing of (or in the face of a strenuous objection by) the quarterback, it’s only fair to a guy who is expected to act like he’s got one foot in each camp to be treated like he does.

This means not only being told in advance that a key move is coming but also having a chance to make his case against the move in a meaningful fashion before the decision is finalized.  And that applies to every starting quarterback (including Rodgers and the rest of them).

The team has a fair expectation that the starting quarterback necessarily will be acting like much more than just another player. The starting quarterback should expect to be treated that way all the time, and not only when it benefits the team to have the quarterback assisting the coaching staff on an unofficial basis.

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Categorised in: Sports